Skip to content

War and Peace and IT Glossary

By Mark Schwartz

EBook Available Now On:

Free Resource

When my publisher asked me to write a glossary for War and Peace and IT, I happened to be re-reading Ambrose Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary, his cynical and amusing re-thinking of the dictionary that included definitions like “BORE, n: A person who talks when you wish him to listen” and “BACK, n: That part of your friend which it is your privilege to contemplate in your adversity.” Well, you can imagine what happened when I sat down to write my glossary. My publisher later convinced me that there was a need for a serious definition of each term, but my initial definitions have survived in the blue text.

  • Format PDF
  • Pages 22

About the Resource

When my publisher asked me to write a glossary for War and Peace and IT, I happened to be re-reading Ambrose Bierce’s The Devil’s Dictionary, his cynical and amusing re-thinking of the dictionary that included definitions like “BORE, n: A person who talks when you wish him to listen” and “BACK, n: That part of your friend which it is your privilege to contemplate in your adversity.” Well, you can imagine what happened when I sat down to write my glossary. My publisher later convinced me that there was a need for a serious definition of each term, but my initial definitions have survived in the blue text.

Mark Schwartz
Mark Schwartz

Mark Schwartz

Mark Schwartz is an iconoclastic CIO and a playful crafter of ideas, an inveterate purveyor of lucubratory prose. He has been an IT leader in organizations small and large, public, private, and nonprofit. As the CIO of US Citizenship and Immigration Services, he provokes the federal government into adopting Agile and DevOps practices. He is pretty sure that when he was the CIO of Intrax Cultural Exchange he was the first person ever to use business intelligence and supply chain analytics to place au pairs with the right host families. Mark speaks frequently on innovation, bureaucratic implications of DevOps, and Agile processes in low-trust environments. With a computer science degree from Yale and an MBA from Wharton, Mark is either an expert on the business value of IT or just confused and much poorer.

To Author Archive